Climate Modellers Waiting for Observations to Catch Up with Their Predictions

Reblogged from Watts Up With That:

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

h/t Dr. Willie Soon; In climate science, when your model predictions are wrong, you wait for the world to correct itself.

New climate models predict a warming surge
By Paul VoosenApr. 16, 2019 , 3:55 PM

For nearly 40 years, the massive computer models used to simulate global climate have delivered a fairly consistent picture of how fast human carbon emissions might warm the world. But a host of global climate models developed for the United Nations’s next major assessment of global warming, due in 2021, are now showing a puzzling but undeniable trend. They are running hotter than they have in the past. Soon the world could be, too.

In earlier models, doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) over preindustrial levels led models to predict somewhere between 2°C and 4.5°C of warming once the planet came into balance. But in at least eight of the next-generation models, produced by leading centers in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and France, that “equilibrium climate sensitivity” has come in at 5°C or warmer. Modelers are struggling to identify which of their refinements explain this heightened sensitivity before the next assessment from the United Nations’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). But the trend “is definitely real. There’s no question,” says Reto Knutti, a climate scientist at ETH Zurich in Switzerland. “Is that realistic or not? At this point, we don’t know.”

Many scientists are skeptical, pointing out that past climate changes recorded in ice cores and elsewhere don’t support the high climate sensitivity —nor does the pace of modern warming. The results so far are “not sufficient to convince me,” says Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. In the effort to account for atmospheric components that are too small to directly simulate, like clouds, the new models could easily have strayed from reality, she says. “That’s always going to be a bumpy road.”

In assessing how fast climate may change, the next IPCC report probably won’t lean as heavily on models as past reports did, says Thorsten Mauritsen, a climate scientist at Stockholm University and an IPCC author. It will look to other evidence as well, in particular a large study in preparation that will use ancient climates and observations of recent climate change to constrain sensitivity. IPCC is also not likely to give projections from all the models equal weight, Fyfe adds, instead weighing results by each model’s credibility.

Read more: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/new-climate-models-predict-warming-surge

It’s nice to learn that the IPCC is considering using observations to constrain model projections.

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One thought on “Climate Modellers Waiting for Observations to Catch Up with Their Predictions

  1. IMHO the reason why these models fail to a-line with observations is that they do not properly take into account the properties of water in their calculations.
    At the phase change of water the Planck coefficient (aka: sensitivity) is zero as the change takes place at constant temperature. Thus, in the presence of water any increase in energy input will reflect in a lower increase in temperature.
    If you apply this fact into the calculations within a model reflecting climate reaction to the greenhouse effect then, I suggest, a more accurate assessment of the warming would result.

    Taking this into account will reveal that water provides a strong negative feedback to the greenhouse effect in spite of it being a greenhouse gas in itself.

    Liked by 1 person

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